Blind Reproduction

Exquisite Poop

March 10 – April 15, 2012
Opening Reception Saturday, March 10, 6-9pm
Live performance by Abacus Jones 8pm

A Gathering of the Tribes
285 East 3rd St. 2nd Floor (Between Ave C & D, near F at 2nd Ave or Delancey/Essex)
New York, NY 10009   (212) 674-3778
info@tribes.org / gatheringofthetribes@gmail.com

To purchase works, contact janet@bruesselbach.com                Catalogs $30, shipping and handling included:

The Pitch

Blind Reproduction is a collaborative art and writing project between 13 artists, 13 writers, and one curator. Sometimes we like to call it Exquisite Poop, combining the names of two less elaborate surrealist party games: Exquisite Corpse and Eat Poop You Cat (the paper game). The artists were invited to contribute one of their smaller two dimensional works, and promise to make another. Images, titles, size and media information were then assigned to the writers, who were charged with describing the art as thoroughly and sincerely as possible, as if the work had been destroyed and needed to be remade, or as if it were being forged. Then, these descriptions were randomly assigned to the contributing artists, with a little tweaking to prevent artists reproducing their own work or that of someone working in media alien to them. The artists were tasked with recreating the artwork they thought the writer had described, without knowing the artist or seeing the original image.

As of the launch of this campaign, the artists are still hard at work doing that. The results so far indicate that the first stage of translation from visual to verbal varies hugely in style and focus, even given stylistic restrictions. Several different strategies were tried, each likely to be misinterpreted wildly depending on the artist. The artist's job is even harder and even more subject to the variations of personality and style. The resulting illustration of mis/communication will vary from wondrous to farcical.

Participating artists:
Alexis Duque
Lorra Jackson
Brian Elig
Blair Kamage
Carly Bodnar
Robert Scott
Joseph Materkowski
Samuel Bjorgum
Lauren Kolesinskas
Jessica Daly
David Hollenbach
BMIP (Babyhead)
Nick Musaelian

Participating writers:
Casey Plett
Chris Heffernan
Allison Moore
Kaitlin Heller
Adam Kavulic
Zane Hart
Matt Keeley
Amanda Spitzer
Jon Boulier
Ammon Ford
Maddie Drake
Josh Crowley
Jenny Bhatt


Curator: Janet Bruesselbach


Janet was inspired to do this project when she took blind gallery owner and retired professor Steve Cannon to art shows and tried to describe the art to him. She found that even conceptual work relied on an attentive visuality sorely lacking from a great deal of art writing. Not only that, but she decided that the spirit of absurd experimentation and attempt toward the art director's rare skill by a wide variety of creators would be worth building a show around. If all goes well, the 13 original pieces and the 13 reproductions, as well as the descriptions, will be shown in 2012 at Steve Cannon's space A Gathering of the Tribes.

Thus, we invite you to support our efforts to pay Mr. Cannon's rent and exhibition costs as well as giving very hard-working artists and writers their fair due. We'll also need to make and print a small catalog, and are offering affordable prints of each set of two visuals and a verbal: original, description, and reproduction. You can even get in early on buying a before and after pair of artworks, ready to hang with the description linking them. We'll even let you commission more work, in the form of either a description of the artwork of your choice, a small artwork based on a description you give, or another full iteration of one of the sets, all three artworks you then own. Pledge early to get your name in the catalog as a supporter in larger and larger font sizes depending on your contribution, as well as updates including the descriptions, images, and discussion of the process with the artists and writers. Tell everyone you know, and maybe this can become a series, with new writers and artists.

Rewards:

$1 Scribble: You get a thank you message from the curator.

$5 Doodle: You receive an email invite to the show opening, and your name in the catalog and website as a Doodle sponsor.

$10 Blurb: You get a postcard invite to the show opening, and your name in the catalog and website as a Blurb.

$25 Sketch: You get both email and postcard invites to the show opening, plus a pdf of the catalog, and your name in it as a Sketch sponsor.

$50 Vignette: You get the postcard and email invites, the pdf catalog, and a physical printed catalog mailed to you, with your name in it as a Vignette sponsor.

$100 Print: You get an archival giclee print of both the original and the reproduction with the description between them, signed by both artists and the writer. You also get the virtual and post invites and the pdf catalog, with your name in nice big font as a Print sponsor in the catalog and the website.

$500 Essay: You get any image you choose described by one of the writers in 500 words or less. You also get the printed catalog signed by every artist and as many of the writers as possible, the pdf catalog, the invites, and your name on the site and catalog as an Essay sponsor.

$1000 Illustration: You describe an artwork, and one of the available participating artists (or the curator) will make it. You keep that artwork, plus the virtual and printed signed catalog. Your name goes on the front page of the catalog and the top of the website as an Illustration sponsor.

$2500 Collection: You get a matched pair of framed artworks of your choice, with a signed and framed print of the description. You also get the signed catalog with your name in the front of it as a Collection sponsor, plus on the website, and all the invites.

$5000 Masterpiece: You get dinner and as much conversation as you can stomach with the curator and any of the artists or writers available in New York City. You also get an artwork set, every print in the series, the signed catalog, and your name in the front of the catalog and top of the website all huge as a Masterpiece sponsor.

$10,000 Blind Leader: You get to see what happens on another iteration of the process - the willing writers and artists will describe and reproduce one of the reproductions. You also get the whole set of three artworks and two descriptions, as well as the signed catalog, as many prints as you desire, the dinner, and your name at maximum prominence as our Blind Leader.

Funders

Print

  • Monica Minden
  • Sally Bodnar
  • Joshua Skrzypek
  • Nathan Salwen

Vignette

  • Matthew Isaac
  • Brookes McKenzie
  • Elizabeth SQ Goodman

Sketch

  • Paul Chamberlain
  • Sam Pocker
  • Casey Goodwin
  • woj

Blurb

  • Kevin Clark
  • Reuben Meltzer
  • Marjorie Tesser
  • Douglas Benedicto

Doodle

  • Adrian Hon
  • Byron Smith

And:

  • Kaethe Minden
  • Lovinsky Joseph
  • Brenda Kirk
  • Emily Hultman
  • Alex Pretzlav
  • Jay Powell

Originals, Reproductions, and Descriptions

Carly Bodnar
“Bodyfolds”
2011
Oil on canvas, 23x23in
$1000
Lorra Jackson
“Pig Flesh”
Oil on canvas, 24x24in
2011
$2000

It’s oil on canvas.

The painting is square, about two and a half feet. It appears to be a chunk of peachy flesh on a body, where on the body who knows. The outside four borders of the painting, which are thick enough to take up about half the surface area, are unfocused and blotchy, while the inside of the painting is a close up of the flesh with what look like deep thin folds in the middle, about six, as if someone inside the flesh had pinched it deeply. These folds, the deepest ones, also look like they might be cuts, neat, old, black-in-the-middle, the-blood-has-stopped-flowing-and-been-washed-away-already cuts. If this is the case, the remaining blood has streaked and mixed with the skin’s natural tone, and there are cross-hatches of red beyond the folds. Also, there are some small dark blotches of red down and right from the middle of the folds, about equidistant from the middle of the folds and the corner of the painting.

The appearance is that the base of the painting is a peachy color, with cross-hatches of red, white, and yellow (and occasionally black to deepen the folds) used on top of the peach.

The longest fold is the left-most one and reaches up into the top of the painting, the second longest is the right-most one and reaches down into the bottom. There is one mini-fold curving on the upper left corner where the focus and the unfocus meet.

The unfocused outside four borders: While on first glance it simply looks like these borders represent a less focused part of the flesh on which there is no folds or cuts – the strokes become more broad and blotchy – on closer inspection it also looks bruised, with purples and dark blues being used as well as reds and yellows (there appears to be no white used on the outsider borders). It’s more sickly yellowish on the bottom border and the left border, and it’s more purple/blue-ish on the top border and the right border.

It does not look like skin, it looks like flesh.

 

-Casey Plett

Lorra Jackson
Untitled
Oil on canvas, 12x18in
2011
$2000
Nick Musaelian
“Woman on a Double Papazan
from Pier One Imports”
Oil on canvas, 18x12in
2011
$1000

The image has a palette of deep blues. Its texture is characterised by broad brush strokes, most notably a large vertical stroke that is one third the width of the image, is central and stretches from the top of the image to the mid point. To the left of this streak are two arc like strokes. Very crudely, one could be described as a parabola, the other a hyperbola. The two arcs intersect at their apexes. The major line of axis lies perpendicular to the broad central stroke, so the arcs form a handle to it, like a mug.

The lower half of the image is dominated by a partial female form. Only the contours of the stomach, thighs and the navel are visible. The upper part of the stomach starts where the large central stroke ends, as though the stroke is covering the upper torso. The subject is facing the viewer, as though they were sitting upright, feet on the same plane as their rear, knees up and legs spread wide. The knees are positioned at the edge of the image so the lower legs are extending beyond the canvas. The texture of the painting alters around the subjects upper right thigh/groin. This area is greenish yellow and has a speckled texture.

-Maddie Drake

Nick Musaelian
“Adam’s Insomnia”
Oil on canvas, 16x20in
2011
$1000
Alexis Duque
“Adam’s Insomnia”
Oil on canvas, 16x20in
2011
$1000

It’s a night scene. It’s painted with a middle twentieth century type of realism much like Edward Hopper. An interior and an exterior through a window that is a large arch that takes up the top half of the canvas. The bottom of the arch is exactly at the half of the canvas and starts about two inches in from the side. The bottom of the wall that the arched window is in drops to cover about two-thirds of the canvas, leaving one-third for the floor of the interior in the foreground.

The sky, through the arch is lit by a moon that is off center to the right, high in the sky but to the side so that it comes just under the curve of the arch. It is full and bright against the dark, but blurred some at the edges. There are clouds in the sky, thick and consuming most of the space of the sky. One comes up and touches the bottom of the moon at angle the moved down to the left. The clouds are illuminated but leave a shape that resembles a knife blade coming from the moon and pointing down, this is a clear patch of sky surrounded by the degrading whiteness of the clouds that disappear off into the dark.

This large arched window that is at the back of the foreground is split in half by a line that is the top of a wall in the background that has another arch, that is in the background but is in the exact center of the first arch window so that the viewer is looking through one arch, directly at another. This arch in the background is only about one-quarter the size of the larger arch, the window arch.

Immediately in front of the smaller arch, in the middle ground is a patch of red with a red line coming from it and trailing off to the left so that it looks like a puddle of blood with some having broken the puddle and moved away in a stream. This line from the puddle of blood points at a staircase in the middle ground. The middle ground is open and plain with nothing in it but the puddle and the staircase. The staircase moves up from right to left, from the extreme left of the middle ground and up into an unseen space that is blocked by the wall of the window arch at the start of the foreground.

The foreground is the interior of a room. Like the middle ground it is sparse and desolate. There is a man lying on the floor in a position that is something like the fetal position but not quite. He is laying in his right side and he is naked. His knees are bent slightly so that his legs are brought up slightly and his hands are between his thighs.
It is an expression of vulnerability which matches the expression on his face which is a mixture of horror, terror, and sadness, as his eyes look off to his left (the top right of the painting) at the moon. The man has dark hair and a dark beard both highlighted by the light to make it seem like gray streaks here and there—he is dark skinned, not black, but a dark brown with western features and can be Middle Eastern or even Indian.

There is an unseen light source from above the man (but the angle of it makes it almost seem as though it comes from the moon—it is another thing that subtly points up at the moon) so that he is laying in a circle of light that almost touches the back wall from the floor, where he is, himself almost touching the back wall, and where, broken off and because of the angle from above and in front that the light does come from it touches the back wall in an arch of light behind the man’s head and torso. The arch of light is under the window arch, to the left and touches the floor just at where the man lays.

The tops of the man’s thighs are in the light on the floor but the rest of his legs are off in the dark. The rest of the foreground is dark and sparse. His legs point toward another staircase. This one is not as large as the middle ground staircase but wider. It is about as wide as the man’s bent legs and body. The staircase touches the back wall and moves up from the far right of the foreground off the right side of the painting to come almost level, as it leaves the picture, with the bottom of the window arch.

That is all there is as far as objects. The entire piece if very sparse. The colors are simple and reminiscent of a late nineteenth century Dutch pallet. Dark browns, dark tans, dark blues. The sky and the floor of the foreground are a similar deep blue with the sky much darker and the clouds, though somewhat lit, darker than the lit circle of the foreground (except for the line of cloud that touches the moon which is as bright at the lit part of the floor). The wall in the middle ground that has the small arch is a medium sort of brown with the shadow of the arch a very dark brown to match the hue of the sky. The ground of the foreground is a dark tan, like sand at night. The middle ground staircase is the same tone as the sand and has a similarity in color but seems to have more orange in it that makes it stand out a more. The blood in the middle ground is a deep, or even dirty, crimson. The wall of the foreground with the window arch is a darker version of the brown of the wall of the middle ground. The staircase in the foreground is a dark clay gray, almost like cinderblock at night. The man is a dark brown similar to the darkest part of the foreground wall but with warm and cool highlights that make him more of an amalgamation of the all the colors of the entire piece.

-Chris Heffernan

Alexis Duque
“Infamous City”
Acrylic on canvas, 20x15in
2010
$2000
BMIP
“Infamous City”
Graphite drawing and digital collage, 20x15in hot press print
2011
$2000

In the mere 16x20 inches that Infamous City spans, viewers are immediately struck with a labyrinthine architecture. The style of this architecture seems to be caught between rustic Italian village and conjoined condominium complexes. The public visibility of the City is reminiscent of a cross between a nudist New York City and the Casbah. The maze of rooms and arcades keeps the viewer moving from unit to unit, a fascinated hostage. This is not apparent until one notices the characters in the drawing that have a truck, and another astride a bicycle. But where to? Beyond the interiors visible, the Infamous City exists as a dollhouse, one room deep, in which the figures are positioned as and in acts of play. This city is floats against a white nothingness. Hallways and arcades are obscured; the drawing seals off this space into its own microcosm. Then again, there is considerable detail in this piece. Empty bottles and birds litter the floors. G- strings and pregnancies are visible. However smudgy, we can pick out individual terracotta tiles that make up the roofs. Men, women, and even a pair of dogs are engaged in all manners of interaction easily inferred.

But while the female figures are typically bare breasted, the male figures seem to be uniformed and members of a military that has taken over this multiplex bordello-in-ruins. Gender roles are clear in Infamous City. Women are naked or scantily clad and service the soldiers. Non-military men are at the wrath of the soldiers. Children play in squalor. A woman gives birth while a soldier stands guard outside. But military brutality coexists with hedonistic pleasure. Is the military presence perpetrating the bacchanal, or merely engaging willing residents? Given the firepower that the soldiers and their superiors have, and the amount of figures held at gunpoint, it seems that the female figures are making good choices, if in fact they have any. It is obvious that the mood of the piece is far from military occupation. The Biggest Little Whorehouse in Texas, and Where's Waldo? spring to mind. If physicality is the focus of the inhabitants of the Infamous City, the physicality of the drawing itself is at the same time a stumbling block for the viewer.

The size prevents the kind of clarity that would illuminate some of the murkier goings-on, and the drawing itself is technically lacking- often leaving slightly awkwardly proportioned figures in ambiguous (if at least sexually so) situations. The crude qualities of the drawing may suit the subject matter, but unfortunately, they hardly seem intentional. As a result, the piece is no longer a detailed illustration or diagram, but the labor of an artist with a vivid imagination, and a perversely interesting sense of play.

-Allison Moore

Isaac Pelepko
Untitled
Graphite drawing, 18x24in
2011
$2000
Carly Bodnar
“Towering Feminine”
Graphite drawing, 22x30in
2011
$1000

First of all, there's no color. It’s a pencil drawing. Throughout most of the piece there are no hard lines, neither in the shading nor on the figures present.
There is a primary figure in the center. A towering female body, muscular and feminine. She stands in the center of twenty five secondary female figures, all young slender sexual creatures...i'll come back to them. The central figure stands over them with clear power. Her legs are naked and exposed, as thick as the torsos of the others. She grips her own thigh with her right hand, fingers spread wide. She wears panties with polka-dots, disheveled, with the crotch pulled to her right side exposing her clean shaven cunt: pillowy and placid, no one is touching it. Her dark wife beater is pulled up enough to show her horizontal innie bellybutton. She has an hourglass figure. Her breasts are not featured, but, from the highlighting, we see that they are present. Her shoulders are bare and lean, but are disproportionate to her legs, which are huge. Her neck is stretched and wrapped like a tribal African, but instead of rings there appears to be beads or pearls tightly forcing her head upwards. Her head is that of a plastic baby doll, expressionless with a million mile stare you never expect to see change.

They all stand in what seems to be a sporting arena with lights and seats in the distance. The women appear to be locked in some kind of gladiator like sex act, piling on top of one another. Seven of the surrounding figures stand out particularly, together they form a "U" shape around the central figure. Beginning with the top left:
A blond with vague facial features, her head is even with the shoulder of the primary. She wears dark pants and a form fitting belly shirt with a face on it. He leans back with her arms behind her, pressing her breasts out and up suggestively.
Below, another blond, this one gripping the right leg of the primary figure with a handful of flesh pinched in her little hand. Her face is buried in the thigh beside the central figure's right hand.

A brunette with a rose in her pointed ear, elvish look about her and a difficult expression on her face. She wears a little hat and a tight sleeveless jumper with a dark belt. She pulls on the right leg of the primary figure, her own leg, puny but proportional, thrust between the primary figure's legs.
The fourth is at the bottom of the central figure's left leg, only her back side is visible. Blond hair in a bun, t-shirt, petite ass, exposed.
Next is a nymphet in profile, biting the left thigh: mouth open, eyes closed. She is kneeling in a loose, sleeveless dress with the central figure's left hand gently resting on her head.
Huddled close is the next girl, also kneeling, also biting: she grips and bites the left hand that rests on the other's head. Her hair is darker and she is somehow younger, more fragile in a flowing miniskirt jumper and flats.

Directly above, in the background on the action stands the last featured girl. She holds a banner above her head with three blank faces, her own face vague but screaming.
Together they give an impression of chaos and struggle and all the trappings of passion and disgusting honesty.

-Ammon Ford

David Hollenbach
“Portrait”
Acrylic and collage, 8x10in
2011
$800
Jessica Daly
“Portrait”
Acrylic and collage, 8x10in
2011
$800

This is a paper collage and acrylic paint, 8x10 inches.
You're staring directly at a singular page of what looks to be a Women's magazine. A woman's face. She's selling you something. The shape and style of your average magazine close-up.

It's like an advertisement stripped of its communication; there are no words on the page. A traditional golden-ratio in proportions. We're dealing in 3/4 ratio, image-Content to negative space. Your standard portrait of Beautiful Woman, perfect and so close like she has something to say. I want you to see one of these close-ups; an ad for lipstick, shampoo, skin cream. Now you must remove her face. Her facial features are floating and isolated in the places they belong, simply placed in their locations, cut and pasted where they should be, rather than having grown there.

Start from the beginning. I want you to think of paper. We're dealing with a white background, smudged lightly with dark dust and maybe fingerprints. Imagine an advertisement: a red-haired woman - the kind of red like smooth orange Blondes that dream and wish for red - just the hair, cut crudely from a magazine and placed here.

Let's construct this woman together. We've got red lips here, cut out and placed precisely where a mouth belongs, and the red of the lips is color you'd expect to match a woman with this kind of orange-blonde hair. The red hair, that's what she wants to say. But it's not red.
Imagine also, a white nose pasted in, white, colorless, soft and round in its features, piggish but not pig, something that doesn't belong; maybe stout proboscis: let the sound of the word dictate its shape.

If you can picture her, this woman, in business casual. She's got on Black Blazer in the way of two angular strips of black paper, side 1 and 2, the white "V" between them, and that space the "V" creates could be shared with the face - which is nothing but for the defining characteristics, those lips, remember, and the nose - but there's a separation by red paper. Imagine red catalog dresses, pieces of them ripped and put here like a choker, a bow-tie, a handkerchief. All of that orange hair stops around this red-dress-neck scarf.
I want you to see where her "red" bangs would be, on her forehead which is simply whiteness, space, nothing, and see the nothingness becoming object itself, and lapping onto the bangs, as if the background was now on top. Like tiny hands as brushstrokes climbing the hair, reaching from where her face should be, to conflate the dimensions and space.

There are no words, I said. But there are two letters: both of them "O" - these are her eyes, and I want you to place them gaping where they belong, big and blank, and that's all.

-Jon Boulier

Jessica Daly
“Blue Girl”
Digital photo
laser print, 18x18in
2011
$400
Brian Elig
“Projection”
Digital photo inkjet print, 12x12in
2011
$300

This is a square photograph taken by projecting video onto a scene and photographing the result. The color palette is white, blue and black, with perhaps hints of purple, green and brown, though I may be wrong to infer those. A white, twenty-something brunette girl stands with her back to the viewer. She looks over her left shoulder at the viewer. Her gaze is one of patience tinged with reproach. She has been standing, one senses, for a long time. Her eyebrows are high and thin with a gentle arch; her nose and lips prominent, her eyes and lashes large. She wears a white v-backed shift and a necklace. We can see only her upper body terminating just above her elbows, which are at her sides. There is blue-black at the top of the picture and in the girl’s loose bun; a diagonal band from middle left to mid-top right of blue-white overtakes the middle; the bottom right corner has a bit of blue. White exposure squiggles--like sloppy cursive over the woman's body, and one a bit like a skeleton torso or a hat-tree on the left--cover and perhaps compose the diagonal band. The top quarter is predominantly dark; the bottom two thirds are predominantly light. She stands in the middle of the scene. The top of her head is about a seventh from the top of the square.

-Jamie T. Clark

Brian Elig
“Space Gurl”
Acrylic on paper, 24x36in
2011
$1000
Lauren Kolesinskas
“Space Gurl”
Acrylic on paper, 24x36in
2011
$1000

The bottom half of the painting contains a giant, mostly square-shaped ball of fire, with countless flame tendrils swirling around and upward like the short branches of some dense, orange bush. In the center of the ball of fire, slightly to the lower left, is an upward-looking eye, also made of fire but slightly brighter than the rest, with a stream of flame flying up out of the pupil, lapping at the underside of the raised boot of a girl in a tight-fitting space suit of sorts. It clings tightly to her, but seems a little looser around the torso. There are a few seams around the arms. The boots run to mid-calf. On her back is some sort of backpack-type pouch with the hatched texture of a honey-baked ham.

She is facing to the right, defiantly, mostly an aqua color, and it appears as though she's somehow straddling the flame, her right knee jutting out with her foot planted in the middle of the aforementioned fireball as if attempting to squelch it, perhaps, or maybe ride it. Around her lanky body swirls a light blue mist, it seems. Her perky breasts are perhaps an a-cup, and jut outward/upward over her raised knee.

Her helmet is like if you took a rabbit's head rounded it off into a mostly spherical shape, pulled out its ears so they were stretched out a little, and then turned the ends back inward. The reflections of stars on the top look something like glowing sperm, almost. The viewport looks like a hungry, slightly smirking mouth, and you can just see the top of her head through it. Her hair is short and blond (though depicted, as with the rest of her, using only blue) and swept downward in an emo-like fashion over her slightly evil-looking, almond eyes. Her head looks very round. Reflected in the helmet, below the viewport, you can see most of another similar-looking face with even more evil-looking eyes, and a mouth that appears to be consumed with a burst of blue electricity.

The background color of the entire painting is a dark blue. Swirling is a fundamental theme. Short strokes. Only shades of blue and orange are used.

-Josh Crowley

Lauren Kolesinskas
“Hand Hunt”
Goache and ink on paper, 5x12in
2011
$800
Robert Scott
“I BLAME YOU”
Goache and ink on paper, 8x12in
2011
$800

The media of the piece is ink and gouache, and the size is 8 by 12 inches. It’s a colored-in ink drawing, and the drawing is in somewhat of a comic-book style. The main colors in the piece are pale yellow, peach, brown, lavender, lime green, turquoise, red and mustard.

The sky is pale yellow with peach clouds done in a wash from the darker top to the lighter bottom. The shape of the clouds is reminiscent of the inner sleeve of the Sgt. Pepper’s album, but each cloud has a defined shape. Beneath the sky are two rows of lavender smoke-like foliage with dead trees popping up. There are eight trees; four brown, four darker purple. The trees are not evenly spaced. The colors alternate, brown-purple-brown-purple. In the foreground is a red grass-covered hill.

The red hill has four mushroom patches, plus a pair in the lower left corner. The mushrooms themselves are very cartoony with a shape like a Dove Bar. They all have thick brown stalks. The caps are pale yellow or peach (the same two colors as the sky and clouds), and some have blue spots. The first patch, in the 11-o’clock position on the hill, is three mushrooms: one yellow-spotted one positioned behind the hill so you can’t see its stalk, one peach one and one yellow one. The second at 1-o’clock is 2 rows of 3 for a total of six. The back row is three small mushrooms: yellow, peach-spotted, yellow. The front row is a medium-sized yellow-spotted, a very large yellow, and a smaller peach. The patch at the 4-o’clock position is 3 in a triangle. The top of the triangle is small yellow-spotted, the left triangle-base is a yellow (with six small specks on its right face), and the right-base is a peach-spotted with an arrow sticking out of its cap. (More on the arrows later.) In the very bottom-right corner, the pair of mushrooms are both small, one yellow, and one very small peach-spotted.

The biggest patch is in the lower left corner -- taking up the 7 and 8-o’clock positions. It is 11 mushrooms in a pattern very similar to the speck-pattern on the left-triangle-base mushroom. The top of the patch forms a back-slash shape, while the other mushrooms form a cluster around the base of the slash. The topmost mushroom of the slash is a medium-sized peach-spotted. Next is a tiny yellow, then another medium peach-spotted. The next in the backslash shape is a large yellow, and the last in the slash-shape is a large yellow-spotted. The yellow spotted has some yellow-blood drops on it with a millipede-creature snaking behind it. (More on both of those later as well.) A mushroom directly horizontal from the 2nd-slash mushroom (the tiny yellow) on the right is a yellow, but its cap has been dented and the stalk is snapped. Beneath the broken mushroom, on a plane only slightly below the 3rd-slash (second medium peach-spotted) is a medium-sized peach mushroom with one yellow-blood drop on it, and a second drop about to land on it. The last mushroom on the right side of the slash is about at 1-o’clock from the large yellow-spot and on the same plane as the 4th-slash (large yellow), and is a tiny peach-capped, sitting in a river of yellow-blood with a couple of drops on its cap. As for the left-side of the mushroom slash: The first is a mushroom almost identical to the 4th-slash (large yellow) on the same plane as that 4th-slash. It is approximately the same distance to the left of that mushroom as the broken mushroom is to the right of the 2nd-slash (tiny yellow). Beneath this mushroom is two: a large yellow-spotted slightly behind a larger peach. These two are slightly behind the 5th-slash (large yellow-spotted with millipede and drops).

The piece has four millipede creatures. These creatures have a brown humanoid head with glasses, ears, a human nose, and a sucker-mouth where the neck would be. The head is joined to the body at the top of the head. The body is segmented: The alternating colors are turquoise and lime-green. The segment attached to the head and the tail-segment are always turquoise. The tail is a darker blue claw, which may be either up-turned or down-turned. The positioning of the creatures: One at the 12-o’clock position on the hill (down-turned tail-claw). One at the 3-o’clock position where we cannot see its tail. The aforementioned one which is behind the bottom mushroom, with its head at the 6-o’clock position (upturned tail-claw), and finally one at 9-o’clock, where we only see the back-end (upturned tail-claw). The millipedes seem to have about 12 sets of legs, but we do not see a complete set on any creature.

The foreground of the piece is a male creature shooting hand creatures with a bow and arrow. The male creature is in the upper-center of the piece, while the three hand creatures take up the entire bottom half. All of these creatures have their upper half hovering above their bottom half.

The male creature’s top half is a brown humanoid body, and his lower half is a lime-green human foot. The top half is strong-looking but not particularly muscular. He holds a turquoise composite bow and is aiming a dark blue arrow with brown head and green tail; he’s aiming at something off-canvas at the 8:45 position. He has no navel and dark blue nipples. His head is bald, though he has a red arrow on his head, similar to the kid in the Avatar cartoon. His eyes are toggle-switches with a yellow base and gray switch in the neutral position. He has no nose, but has a circular mouth like a lamprey from which exudes a red tentacle with the sucker-pad side up. As for his foot, you can see the purple severed top, including the flesh and a white, sawed-flat bone in the center. The foot is a right foot, with a prominent ankle. It’s mostly horizontal at a slight downward angle, with the big toe pointing to the left, at the tail of the 9-o’clock millipede’s tail.

The three hand creatures are turquoise. Their top half is a hand, but the bottom half is the waist down on a male in purple tights. Each of the hands have different colored nails. The three hands are positioned in an inverted triangle shape. The two top hands are left hands, while the bottom hand is a right hand. All three hands have a ring featuring a green-irised eye. The top-left and bottom hand have the ring on their middle fingers, while the top-right hand has it on its ring finger.

The top-left hand has yellow nails, and is in a relaxed position, with the pinkie somewhat curled, and the rest of the fingers following in the way that a hand naturally does. Its lower half is in a running position with its left foot forward. This is the only hand that does not have an arrow in it. The top-right hand has green nails and is closed in a fist and has 5 arrows in it. Three are in the thumb -- one in the middle section and two in the ball of the thumb. One arrow is in the index finger, and one hit the pinkie, but looks to be lodged between the pinkie and ring finger. All of the arrow hits are causing yellow blood to bleed from the hand. The Hand-creature’s lower half is kneeling in a puddle of yellow blood. The bottom hand has pink nails and four arrows. The first is through the tip of the index finger, just below the nail. The second is in the second-from-the-top section of the middle finger, and the other two arrows are in the base of the hand near where the tendons connecting the fingers would be. All of the arrows are causing more yellow blood, dripping down. The one from the middle finger is causing the river of yellow blood around the mushroom on the left-corner patch. There are drops of yellow blood on the hand’s right leg. The hand is in a similar position to the top-left hand -- a relaxed position, but with the index finger being the most curled, and the other fingers curling sympathetically. The legs are balancing on the ball of the right foot, though it is clear this hand-creature is about to fall. The bottommost millepede-creature watches.

There are no elephants in this piece.

Matt Keeley

Robert Scott
“Bride of Davey Jones”
digital, inkjet print 11x18in
2009
$100
Samuel Bjorgum
“Woman in a White Dress”
Inkjet print of digital, 18x12in
2009
$100

The image is created digitally, with all the textures and shadings done as an amalgam of individual monochromatic segments. Shadows and reflections are created with layers laid over others; the overall effect is soft and slightly grainy, especially since certain larger sections of the canvas have been placed on top of textured backgrounds, within which the artist has defined smaller shapes and patterns. The primary palette is shades of green and brown, with the major central figure picked out in white.

The image shows a woman in a white dress, perhaps a wedding gown or a medieval noblewoman's gown, wearing a green, heart-shaped locket with a keyhole in it. It dangles below her breast. Her skin is pale and her hair, blowing behind her in the breeze, is dark; she stares out from under a determined brow, looking at a point just over the viewer's right shoulder. Her own right hand is reaching up to clasp the green tentacle that wraps around her from behind. She's standing on the seashore, exactly where the waves hit the beach; immediately behind her, a green sea monster, perhaps a kraken, bursts out of the water, its tentacles surrounding her in a halo. In front of her, on the beach, lies a wooden plank, a few bottles, and a pirate-hatted skull. The top of a buried treasure chest protrudes from the sand.

Behind her, on the right side of the frame, an island is visible in the distance, covered in the silhouettes of palm trees. On the left side of the frame, a ship with white sails is burning and listing, about to sink, the smoke rising past the top of the image. It's unclear whether she has crawled out of the ocean from this ship or has caused the wreck. Either way, the image is about her.

-Kaitlin Heller

Samuel Bjorgum
Untitled
Oil and alkyd on panel, 12x12in
2010
$1000
Joseph Materkowski
Untitled
Oil and alkyd on panel, 12x12in
2011
$1000

12” by 12”, oil and alkyd on panel.

The image is comprised of three images, overlaid, one on top of the other. The images are each layered over narrow strips of tape, of consistent width (approximately 1/4th to 3/8th inch) throughout. With the tape removed, the result is a set of complete images, each seen as though through slightly parted vertical blinds (vertical blinds on which are painted additional images.) The background of the primary image is black shadow, while the other is a warm reddish orange, creating alternating stripes.

The most dominant and clear image is a woman’s face in profile. Realistically rendered, her fair skin meets a background of dark shadow in blended strokes, as if in soft focus. Her head is tilted back at a 30 degree angle, her chin in the lower left, her high forehead reaching the top of the frame, just right of center. Her eyes are heavy lidded and dark, with no white showing. The slender brows are neatly arched and slightly raised. Her gaze pulls forward and down. Her lips, a lush, saturated pink are parted to reveal a mouth about a thumbs width open.
Another image of the same plump, open mouth is positioned slightly down from center, resting on what would be the apple of the first face’s cheek. The mouth faces forward, the parted lips appearing wet.

Another mouth is slightly right of center in the upper third, positioned on the forehead of the central face, running from just above the arch of the eye brow to the temple. This mouth is tilted downward, so that the upper lip is almost entirely obscured and the lower lip and teeth are prominent. This mouth is open to the same suggestive degree as the others.

Beneath the third mouth is an eye, falling on the side of the primary face, in line with the first eye. This eye is one fifth the size of the eye of the primary face, and facing forward, but also heavy lidded and dark.

It should be clear that thee are separate images in overlay, and not an amalgamation. The connection between the features is clear; they all belong to the same subject, with similar coloring. The blending of the images is diaphanous and nebulous.

The right third of the image depicts a non-descript body part, starting one fifth of the way down the left side in the same fair skin tone, leading into a softly curving semicircle of shaded skin. This section ends beside the face, separated by a strip of whitish skin, shadowed on either side, running diagonally from upper right to lower center. The final fifth of the left third is a blue streak of light.

The lower left corner shows two strips of whitish flesh tone similar to the one described above. These strips are beneath the primary face’s chin, separate by shadowed sections.

-Zane Hart

Joseph Materkowski
Self Portrait
Oils on canvas, 12x12in
2011
$800
Blair Kamage
Self Portrait
Oil on canvas, 12x12in
2011
$800

There are three colors: two grays and one black. These colors are layered on top of each other. Gray #1 is the color the entire canvas is painted. It is the a soft gray, like that of a field mouse. Gray #2 is sandwiched between Gray #1 and the black. Gray #2 is darker. It is the dark gray of a storm cloud. There is no shading. The colors are strong and distinct and massed together.

It is an almost side profile of the subject. He is turned slightly towards the viewer. The bottom right hand corner is the start of the subject’s upper portion of his left shoulder, and just beyond the middle of the canvas is where the upper portion of the subject’s chest is. This portion is painted in black, and all the black is connected together except around the subject’s right eye. That piece floats alone on Gray #2.
The outside of the black angles from both ends to the subject’s neck. From the shoulder, a roughly 45-degree angle. From the chest, a roughly 70-degree angle. From the left cheek of the subject, towards the back of the subject’s head is black. The chin is black. Where the mouth and nose of the subject would be is black. These areas, like the subject’s eyes, are not defined. The left eye of the subject looks to be crying a giant black tear. The right eye of the subject is a black square that looks like a bite has been taken out of the bottom right-hand side of it. All other areas not mentioned in the black portion of this painting (I.e. the subject’s left cheek, the spaces between the cheek and the left eye, the spaces around the eyes) those parts of the subject are the Gray #2. The black portions are painted on top of Gray #2. And, Gray #2 pokes out all around the outsides of the black portions.

The subject looks like he is wearing a hat of some kind. There is no bill present, and it comes to a tip at the top. With the color of Gray #2, the subject looks like he is wearing a giant, foiled-wrapped Hershey Kiss on his head… without the Hershey Kiss flag, though. The hat is tipped forward almost down to where the eyes should be, and the back of the hat appears to be resting on very start of the crown of the subject’s head.

Gray #2 and the black are not completely painted in. There are tracks and dots and slashes in the painting technique where the colors below are peaking through. Also, brush strokes are visible only on the Gray #2 layer.

-Adam Kavulic

Blair Kamage
“Sleeping Beauty”
Screenprint on paper, 16x20in
2011
$800
David Hollenbach
“Sleeping Beauty”
Acrylic on paper, 16x20in
2011
$800

The image ‘Sleeping Beauty’ is a screen print made of 2 impressions – green and red, and a deep brown where they combine. In the background, there’s a stone wall covered with a dense floral creeper covering the top of the picture. The wall is seen behind the woman’s head and behind her thigh and knees.

A woman, seen sideways, lies with her head to the left of the work, her hand suspended downwards and limp. The profile of her head is seen, tilting towards the wall. She has thick hair. She lies on some sort of rug with a paisley design.

In the foreground, is some lawn or grass, which appears to be a platform made of 2 rows of the same stone as the wall in the background. The tiny flowers of the creeper extend from behind her hair on the left of the picture to the foreground. They extend all the way from the left corner of the picture to the right corner, below the 2 rows of the wall. Another branch of the creeper extends from her thighs upto the forground of the picture, meeting the creeper that goes from left to right.

The woman is in an ankle length brown dress, with the right foot crossed over the left foot.

-Jenny Bhatt

This page will be updated as the project progresses and the website changes.

©2011-2012 Janet Bruesselbach (unless otherwise noted)